Elon Musk

Elon Musk: Rockets will fly people from city to city in minutes

People will soon be able to fly from city to city within minutes, rocket and car entrepreneur Elon Musk says.

Mr Musk made the promise at the International Astronautical Congress (IAC) in Adelaide, Australia.

A promotional video says the London-New York journey would take 29 minutes.

Mr Musk told the audience he aimed to start sending people to Mars in 2024. His SpaceX company would begin building the necessary ships to support the mission next year.

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Super Nintendo

A $25 accessory fixes the biggest problem with the mini Super Nintendo

A new $25 accessory fixes the biggest problem with Nintendo’s miniature Super Nintendo: It removes the wires!

Super NES Classic Edition wireless gamepad (8bitdo)8bitdo

The “SN30 2.4G Wireless Controller” from 8bitdo is a near-perfect re-creation of the original Super Nintendo gamepad, except it has no wires. That means no wires to trip over, no wires to snag and pull your console (or TV), and no wires for your dog to chew through. It’s a nice nod to modernity on a console that’s dedicated to re-creating the early-to-mid-’90s.

More than just convenient, having a wireless game pad for the new Super Nintendo makes it something you can easily leave plugged in to your home entertainment center. As it is, having the new Super Nintendo plugged in means having wires strew across your living room. Without a wireless controller, a wire extends from the included Nintendo game pad in your hand to the tiny console; from the console, an HDMI cable and a micro-USB cable stretch to the display and a power outlet.

But with the wireless Super Nintendo game pad from 8bitdo, there’s no need for the console to sit in the middle of the room — you can securely place it near your TV, with all the wires hidden away, and use the game pad from the comfort of your favorite seat.

Even better: By pressing down on the d-pad and the Select button at the same time, you can access the console’s Home menu where you can save your game or switch to a new one — the only way to do that on the standard console otherwise is by pushing the Reset button. Convenient!

Super NES Classic Edition wireless gamepads (8bitdo)8bitdo

For $25, you get one wireless game pad and a receiver (which plugs in to the console). And yes, don’t worry, you can get the European version above (with colored buttons) for the North American console — either version of game pad works with the Super NES Classic Edition.

Devante Adams

Shannon: Danny Trevathan hit on Devante Adams was dirty

– For him to take that shot, and that mouthpiece to pop out of his mouth like it did, you know that was some tremendous force. I knew instantly. When you take a shot like that to the face or to the side of the jaw, you’re going out, and he was unconscious. And it’s very, very unfortunate.

And if the NFL is serious, these are the type of hit that they’re trying to take out of the game, Skip, these are very dangerous. We saw Anquan Boldin get hit something like this in a game about seven, eight years ago, and it broke his jaw, and you know he had to get surgery and had a fracture, orbital fracture also. I don’t think Danny’s a dirty player, though, but this was a dirty and unnecessary hit. That’s a very dangerous play.

When you lead with the crown of your helmet, and you hit a guy in his face, face on or the side of his jaw, bad things normally happen. So I would be shocked if he doesn’t get, at the bare minimum, one game. But I think it’s going to probably be more in line with two because he doesn’t have a history.

– I believe he will get a game, and I do not believe he deserves to be suspended for a game. You know him. I have watched him closely ever since he intercepted Tony Romo in that game back in whatever it was, 2013, whatever, the shoot-out game.

SHANNON SHARPE: Yep, 51-48.

– Yeah, 51 to 48, after Tony Romo had thrown for 506, and then he threw it to Danny Trevathan with the game on the line. But I view it as an unfortunately dirty hit by a player with no reputation for ever playing dirty.

SHANNON SHARPE: Right.

– He just plays hard. And I hope people out there can get this. I get it only because I worked– I covered the Chicago Bears for the Chicago Tribune for three years. And I was shocked, having grown up in the Cowboys-Redskin rivalry, this is the oldest rivalry in pro football.

SHANNON SHARPE: Oh, yeah.

– This is the one that runs deepest, the blood runs– obviously, you’ve got Raiders-Broncos coming up Sunday. That’s rivalry.

– Ravens-Steelers.

– Ravens-Steelers, you could certainly argue that one. But this one, even though it’s been one-sided in recent history– for a long time, the Bears dominated.

– Bears dominated.

– Yeah.

– Absolutely.

– But they just don’t like each other. There is proximity, you know, because Chicago is right, very close.

SHANNON SHARPE: Both Midwest.

– It’s only about an hour up to Milwaukee from Chicago.

SHANNON SHARPE: Right.

– And so he was rallying to the ball, and he delivered a blow that he was immediately remorseful about. You could just see him on the field, and he was going back and forth. And it looked like they were jawing at each other, but I think he was telling Aaron, I didn’t mean it.

SHANNON SHARPE: Right.

– And I think Aaron acknowledged, that he was telling him back, I get it. I know you didn’t mean it. But a weird thing happened as the play developed, and that was that, A, the refs were slow to throw the flag on it because the ball became loose on the ground. And so it looked like the Bears were celebrating the hit.

I’m pretty sure– because you see Pernell McPhee, 92, just jumping up, throwing his fists. But he’s actually doing that.

SHANNON SHARPE: Right.

– Like, we got the ball, and they were clinging to dear life because it was still 21-7. And they thought that Glennon had had one drive that looked decent and scored a touchdown with a nice throw. The rest of the game was a disaster. But the point is, I think Green Bay got upset because it looked like the Bears were celebrating the hit, and they were celebrating a recovered fumble. For.

Camila Cabello

Camila Cabello on Debut Album: ‘This Sounds Like Me and Only Me’

Long before a dramatic she said-they said split from the girl group Fifth Harmony, Camila Cabello was planting the seeds for what is looking to become a fruitful solo career. She cracked the Top 20 with friend Shawn Mendes in 2015, and her collaboration “Bad Things” with Machine Gun Kelly topped off at Number Four. Following up the strong precedent set by those songs, the 20-year-old has been establishing herself as a versatile, budding pop diva with singles like “Havana” and “Crying in the Club,” which will appear on her debut solo LP The Hurting. The Healing. The Loving. (The LP’s exact fall release date yet has not yet been announced.)

“It’s kind of like having a huge block of marble and carving out a statue,” she tells Rolling Stone of the process of culling together lyrics, stories and music from the last few years of her life. She wrote the lyrics for the ballad “I Have Questions” a year and a half ago, while “I’ll Never Be the Same” was inspired by a relationship she had a couple years back. “In the Dark” had been written the day after the Grammys about an encounter with an unnamed famous boy she had met at an after-party.

“The final product becomes more clear to you the more you carve at it and work on it. There were songs that five months ago were my favorite songs, and then two weeks after [we] scrapped it from the album,” she explains. “Through trial and error, I’ve written enough finished songs to be able to say ‘Okay, this is me. This sounds like me and only me, and this separates me from what other people are doing.'”

As Cabello perfects her debut statement as a singular artist outside of her former group, she is adjusting to the independence and authority she now has over her music.

Cuphead

Despite its reputation as a difficult game, Cuphead generously teaches players to become experts

Cuphead has a reputation for being difficult, so let’s clarify this up top: Cuphead isn’t impossible; it isn’t the Dark Souls of 2D shooters, nor is it the world’s cutest bullet-hell game; it isn’t even particularly punishing. For a game that has established an identity around an “old-school” (read: hard) design, Cuphead is unexpectedly accessible.

Announced in the summer of 2014, Cuphead cultivated a fandom around its art style, an homage to 1930s cartoons from Disney and Fleischer Studios. Brothers Chad and Jared Moldenhauer, along with animator Jake Clark, meshed the hand-drawn art with the run-and-gun genre popularized by pixelated games like Mega Man. The result is a throwback on a throwback, an ode to the good old days of games and animation alike.

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Texas football

Texas football extends offers to three St. Louis prospects

Texas Longhorns football doesn’t have a single St. Louis player on the roster, but on Friday the ‘Horns extended three early offers to recruits who call the Gateway Arch city home.

Tom Herman and company offered 2019 wide-receiver Marcus Washington, 2019 outside linebacker Shammond Cooper, and 2020 running back Teriyon Cooper.

The trio all hails from powerhouse Trinity Catholic. Washington and Shammond Cooper are both four-star recruits, while Teriyon Cooper is not yet ranked (likely due to his age).

Washington is ranked as the No. 103 player in his class, and the No. 18 overall wide receiver. He is currently 100% projected to go to Michigan by 247’s Crystal Ball.

Shammond Cooper holds 26 offers, but is 100% projected to go to Oklahoma by 247’s Crystal Ball. The 6’2, 190 recruit is the No. 202 ranked player, and No. 16 OLB.

Teriyon Cooper holds offers from Illinois, Missouri, Kansas State, and Syracuse in addition to Texas and has strong size at 5’9, 178 pounds.

Liz Phipps Soeiro

Librarian faces backlash for rejecting book donation from Melania Trump

Flatliners

Flatliners shouldn’t have bothered coming back from the dead

Back in 1990, Flatliners made a bit of a splash (grossing the equivalent of $114 million today) largely due to historical accident: It happened to be audiences’ first opportunity to see Julia Roberts after Pretty Woman made her an instant superstar. As psychological horror, the movie didn’t quite work, squandering a potentially fascinating premise; nobody would likely remember it today had it featured a cast of unknowns rather than the likes of Roberts, Kiefer Sutherland, and Kevin Bacon.

The existence of this remake, then, is somewhat puzzling. Flatliners itself, as a “property,” doesn’t really have major nostalgic pull. The new cast, headed by Ellen Page and Diego Luna, isn’t designed to lure unsuspecting viewers into garbage. Is it possible that screenwriter Ben Ripley (Source Code) managed to come up with a more compelling take on the material? Is this a rare example of Hollywood taking old dross and spinning it into contemporary gold?

Nope. Flatliners 2017 is the same dumb movie as Flatliners 1990, minus most of the surface charisma. Med student Courtney (Page, insufficiently obsessive) yearns to know what happens after death, and ropes four fellow students—Ray (Luna), Marlo (The Vampire Diaries’ Nina Dobrev), Jamie (English actor James Norton, playing American), and Sophia (Kiersey Clemons, the main girl from Dope)—into sneaking down to their hospital’s basement for some experiments in what amounts to assisted temporary suicide. One by one, they each have their heart stopped for two to three minutes, getting a brief glimpse of the afterlife before being resuscitated. At first, the experience has a druglike effect, inspiring a euphoric feeling that lingers for hours and somehow “rebooting” dormant memories and abilities. The aftereffects soon take a considerably darker turn, however, with all four of the flatliners (Ray declines to die, participating only as an observer/assistant) stalked by people they’ve wronged, in what may or may not be hallucinations.

Ripley demonstrated some ingenuity with Source Code, but he fails to solve this premise’s fundamental problem. Creating necessary tension during the flatlining scenes requires that the characters nearly die, permanently; every single time, there’s frantic medical activity and shouts of “It isn’t working!” Yet Jamie is unaccountably eager to have his heart stopped after watching Courtney barely make it back, and Marlo insists that she’s next right after Jamie almost winds up in the morgue, and so on. What we see of the ostensible afterlife—just ordinary depopulated locations on Earth, made mildly strange via smeared neon or overexposure—doesn’t justify all this mortal recklessness. Neither do the lame “powers” the flatliners acquire after dying, which involve slow-motion shots of club dancing and—hilariously—the others looking on in wonder at Courtney playing the piano (unremarkably), marveling that she can now play again. It’s not as if she’d broken her hands. She’d just… forgotten? And now she remembers? Or something?

None of the actors succeeds in making any of this nonsense credible, or even in establishing much of a personality. The movie’s second half traps all of them in generic jump-scare horror sequences, indifferently staged by director Niels Arden Oplev (best known for the Danish version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo). As in the original, efforts at spookiness are undermined by sappiness; the flatliners come to understand that they need to be forgiven by those they harmed, or forgive themselves, turning what should be a tale of fanatical hubris into a lightweight self-help manual. Sutherland, who turns up in a dull cameo role as the students’ instructor, has suggested that he is in fact still playing Nelson Wright, his character from the 1990 version. That makes zero sense given what occurs onscreen (at best it would entail a truly ludicrous coincidence; the prof remains oblivious throughout), but maybe Sutherland just felt obligated to say anything he could think of that might lend a little intrigue to this pointless rehash.

Sclera tattoo

Sclera tattoo gone wrong prompts warning from model

OTTAWA — A model in Canada is warning others after a botched eye tattoo may leave her completely blind in one eye, CBS Miami reports.

Catt Gallinger, 24, of Ottawa, Canada, said she decided to get a sclera tattoo about four weeks ago. The procedure changes the color of the whites around your eye.

But weeks after the procedure her eye started oozing purple liquid.

“As it stands, it has been agreed by both doctors and the surgeon that my eyesight will not get better. It will either go completely or stay a blurry mess,” Gallinger said in a Facebook post.

~*PLEASE SHARE THIS AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE*~ -Sclera Tattoo- (Whites of the eye tattoo) For everyone…

Posted by Catt Gallinger on Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Gallinger told U.K. news outlet The Sun that she got the tattoo to “make me feel more at home in my body.”

After the purple dye began oozing, she went to a hospital.

Pictures Gallinger has shared on Facebook show various stages of recovery as her left eye reacts to the antibiotic drops. Some images show her eye swollen shut.

According to The Sun, surgeons said her sclera tore from the size of needle used, depth and amount of ink inserted. Doctors were also concerned that the equipment was not sterile and that there was an infection with the excess ink, she said.

“As of today, I have no intention on ever modeling again,” Gallinger wrote in an emotional update.

She has a warning for others thinking about getting the tattoo.

“Look into not just the artist and their portfolio, but to talk to some of their clients, talk to other artists about them and get experiences beforehand,” the model told The Sun.

Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049: our spoiler-free review

It’s been 35 years since Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner hit theaters, and when it takes this long for a sequel to roll around, a few questions need to be answered. No question is more important than “why?” Yes, we’re in a cultural moment where nearly everything is a sequel, prequel, reboot, or spinoff, but Scott’s dystopian film never organically called for a follow-up the way some films do. It’s a neo-noir thriller with an open ending, but from a character and thematic perspective, Scott neatly sewed up the story. Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), an android hunter known as a “blade runner,” learns that all life has some sort of value. Tired of killing others, he decides to go on the run with his android lover Rachel (Sean Young).

That leaves Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049 with a pretty steep hill to climb. The sequel has to live up to the unforgettable visual style of Scott’s film, while simultaneously forging its own identity, and defending its reason for existing in the first place. Turnkey action sequels are fine for comic book movies, but a distinctive classic like Blade Runnerdemands an entirely different standard.

The good news is that Villeneuve’s film is every bit the original’s equal when it comes to breathtaking visuals and design, and Ryan Gosling is perfectly cast as K, the newest blade runner on the hunt for renegade “skin jobs.” The film ultimately doesn’t have the resonance and pure invention of the original, and over its nearly three-hour run time, that becomes increasingly clear. But it’s certainly not for lack of trying.

Let me start by laying out some ground rules: Warner Bros. has pulled off a real Star Wars: The Force Awakens-style situation with Blade Runner 2049 in terms of marketing revelations. Most of the secrets of this film haven’t even been hinted at in the trailers and ads thus far, and that’s how I’m going to keep this initial review. A movie should have the opportunity to reveal its secrets on its own terms — preferably in the theater — so I won’t be going into any plot details beyond what’s been mentioned in the trailers and the opening title card of the film. After the film comes out, we’ll dive in with more spoiler-heavy pieces, but if you want to read something that won’t impact your theatrical experience, this is the review for you.

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